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An active, broad weather pattern is blanketing the Heartland

An active, broad weather pattern is blanketing the Heartland

Weather

An active, broad weather pattern is blanketing the Heartland

Across the Corn Belt, stormy weather continues in the far Midwest, leading to flash flooding. On June 16, prior to the last rainfall, a 42% excess of topsoil moisture was recorded in Minnesota, compared to 40% in Wisconsin. Heat will be accompanied by short-term drought in the southern and eastern Corn Belt, where high temperatures Wednesday should generally be between 90 and 95°F. On June 16, Ohio reported topsoil moisture at 47% very short to short.

On the Plains, cold rains will continue across the northern part of the region, especially from Montana to northern Dakota. Although cool weather temporarily slows crop development, the rain should provide major benefits to spring-sown small grains that are entering the reproductive development phase. Meanwhile, very warm, dry weather in the southeastern half of the Plains reduces topsoil moisture content but accelerates winter wheat ripening and harvest. As of June 16, Oklahoma led the U.S. with 83% of winter wheat acreage harvested, well above the five-year average of 37%.

In the south, widespread showers spread northward through the lower Mississippi Valley. More organized rainfall, associated with a developing low-pressure system over the Gulf of Mexico, is lurking offshore. In much of the region, warm, humid weather promotes a rapid pace of crop development; However, the development of drought in the southeast is putting pressure on reproductive summer crops, such as corn. As of June 16, several states, including South Carolina (68%), North Carolina (63%), Virginia (55%), and Georgia (54%), had topsoil moisture ratings of at least half very short to short.

In the West, rain and snow showers will linger in the northern Rockies and adjacent areas. Cooler air has settled southward in the west, although heat continues from the desert southwest to the southern Rockies. As of June 16, Arizona led the U.S. in cotton squared (51%) and boll setting (15%).